Hang in there: Here are 11 reasons why you aren’t getting any better at golf (but should still have hope)

Golf is like sex. Some people do it for years and never improve. But why? With input from GOLF Magazine Top 100 instructor Jon Tattersall, we’ve drawn up a list of the 11 reasons why you may not be getting better at life’s (second) most enjoyable pursuit.

1. You never practice

You know that whole 10 thousand hours thing? How it takes at least that long to master a skill? Do the math. Ten minutes once a month isn’t going to get you there.

2. You practice unproductively

Smacking drivers on the range until you’re blue in the face might give you a backache. But it’s not going to get you where you want to go. What you need to do is practice with a purpose. “Go to the range to get better at one thing, posture for example,” Tattersall says.  “Once you’ve spent 30 minutes working on that and incorporating into your swing, leave the range.”

3. Your equipment isn’t optimized

“That includes your golf ball,” says Tattersall, who recommends getting your entire arsenal checked at least once a year.

4. You’ve got the wrong mix of clubs

News flash. You’ve got no business carrying a two-iron. You’re also probably not good enough to have more wedges than hybrids in your bag.

5. You don’t track your stats

You think you’re a great putter, and a middling driver. But are you really? Without knowing for sure, you can’t maximize your practice time, much less devise an optimal on-course strategy.

6. You’re not as good as you think you are

Two-twenty over water is not in your wheelhouse, but you always try it, because, well, your weakness is your fondness for the hero shot.

7. You’re too hard on yourself

On approach shots from 150 yards, the average Tour pro leave is 23 feet from the pin. But you somehow believe you should be knocking down the flagstick, so you berate yourself every time you don’t.

8. You ride a cart

You think you’re saving energy. What you’re really doing is losing touch with the natural rhythms of the game.

9. You think there’s a quick-fix

In a world filled with swing tips, you believe there’s a magic one that will solve all your problems. So you search, and search. You might as well be trying to track down Sasquatch, Tattersall says. “The tough news is it comes down to working on good principles long enough for them to become habits.”

10. You’re don’t hit it far enough

Sorry, but size matters. A good way to get better is to swing the club the faster to hit the ball longer. “Any good coach can correct crooked,” Tattersall says. “Getting the ball to go farther is a tougher task.”

11. You focus more on words than feel

You’ve gotten a lot of verbal instruction. But, Tattersall says, “Words don’t translate as well to performance.” Pay more attention to images and feels. It will free up your mind. And your swing.

Source: www.golf.com

Pebble Beach Virtual Golf League

Pebble Beach Virtual Golf League

JOIN THE LEAGUE!

WHEN: EVERY FRIDAY FROM OCTOBER 5 – NOVEMBER 9 · 5-8:30PM

2-4 player best ball competition, four weeks of regular play then playoffs weeks five & six (all teams make playoffs). Rosters can include up to six names, only the players on the team’s roster may compete. Every week your team plays six holes which will take 1 hour to complete. Tee times will be 5pm 6:15pm and 7:30pm with four spaces available. When you sign up for the league you must pick a tee time to compete at each week. The grand prize is $100 range keys for all members of the team and Toptracer gear.

COST PER TEAM: $199

Ready to Sign Up? Click below to register your team!

*Please provide your team roster in the additional notes section when checking out. 

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Development Program: After School Edition

CALLING ALL JUNIORS!

WHEN: September 18th- November 13th from 4-5:30pm.

The program will run for 9 weeks breaking for the holiday season, every Tuesday we will work on different skills ranging from swing mechanics, chipping techniques, reading greens, even on course instruction. Juniors enrolled are entitled to half price range use.

Cost: $300 per junior

Development Program: After School Edition 🏌️

CALLING ALL JUNIORS!

WHEN: September 18th- November 13th

The program will run for 9 weeks breaking for the holiday season, every Tuesday we will work on different skills ranging from swing mechanics, chipping techniques, reading greens, even on course instruction. Juniors enrolled are entitled to half price range use.

Cost: $300 per junior

Labor Day at McInnis Park Golf Center!

Finally, a well deserved day off! Spend it with us at McInnis Park Golf Center! Our tee times are filling up fast! Click below to book yours.

Want to improve your golf game? We have several options to choose from!

Beginner Series

Want to learn how to play golf? Then this is the perfect class for you to get started. The class focuses on fundamentally building golf swings the right way to help students develop good habits. After focusing on the full swing for the first three weeks of the class, the short game is introduced in the last week of the class.

Beginner Series 2.0

The sequel to the Beginners Series is designed to focus on the entire golf game. Each week students will work on a different aspect of the game including putting, chipping/pitching, and the full swing. The last class will go over course management on the course.

Taking it to the Course

This class is designed as an intermediate class for those that have played substantially and are looking to work on their course management skills. What better way to do it than on the course with an Instructor! It’s the perfect way to help you transfer your skills from the range and on to the course.

BOOK A TEE TIME!

Skip the hassle of calling! Book your tee time online with at no additional cost.

Women’s Equality Day – August 26

Happy Women’s Equality Day!

Our club provides a place for women to play, learn, and enjoy a lifelong involvement with golf.

Sunday, August 26

Enjoy a FREE Medium Bucket with a green fee for all women on Sunday, August 26. Also, enjoy 10% off all women’s clothing!

Book a Tee Time

Skip the hassle of calling. Book your tee time online!

Tiger Woods comes up short at another major, but is still the main attraction

“Tiger’s coming!” was the shout of one golf fan directed to Brooks Koepka during Sunday’s final round at the U.S. PGA Championship.

Gentle baiting from the crowd, as well as several roars of delight from around the course after another Tiger Woods birdie, weren’t enough to deter Koepka from a third major title. But the signs are there that Woods is again a force to be reckoned with.

American Koepka, 28, withstood stifling pressure and sweltering heat in St Louis, Missouri, to card a four-under 66 good enough for a two-shot victory, and claim the trophy and the $1.98 million prize.

Woods played his part though in front of a huge gathering of supporters, in pursuit of his first major title in a decade — and came close by returning a 64, his lowest final round in a major ever.

Winning at Bellerive means Koepka has now won three of the last seven majors and becomes only the fifth golfer and first since Woods in 2000 to triumph at both the PGA and U.S. Open in the same year.

“Other than me, my team, everybody was rooting for Tiger,” Koepka said. “It kind of pushes you to step up your game.”

As Woods finished his round and had the clubhouse lead, he had a maximum value of 100, according to Google Trends. While at the same time, Koepka was languishing down at just 27. That’s despite holding a clear lead and playing his final few holes on the course.

The sense of apathy, combined with the love of a sporting comeback, isn’t of concern to Koepka, who accepts he won’t be able to please everyone and still had the support of his fellow professionals.

“I’ve heard some frustration that he hasn’t won a lot of other tournaments, but he’s won three majors now, so he’s definitely winning the right ones,” Adam Scott said. The Australian was playing alongside Koepka in the final group and finished three shots behind him.

More vocal support should come Koepka’s way next month when he takes part in the Ryder Cup as part of Team USA, after the top eight automatic picks heading to the event in Paris were confirmed.

By winning at Bellerive, Koepka finished top of the standings ahead of Dustin Johnson, Justin Thomas, Patrick Reed, Bubba Watson, Jordan Spieth, Rickie Fowler and Webb Simpson. Captain Jim Furyk will pick four others — three on September 3 and the final choice on September 9.

Woods, in finishing runner-up Sunday, jumped from 20th to 11th in the Ryder Cup standings, behind Bryson DeChambeau and Phil Mickelson.

It seems almost unthinkable that Furyk would leave out Woods given his form in the past two majors and his experience of seven previous Ryder Cups.

“I’m just pleased with what I’ve done so far, and now to be part of the Ryder Cup conversation, from where I’ve come to now, it’s been pretty cool,” 14-times major champion Woods said.

The wait continues for the Woods comeback to be completed with that elusive 15th major, but given his form so far in 2018, interest only looks set to increase.

Adam Reed | 

Source: cnbc.com

Does the PGA Championship produce the worst major winners? An investigation

ST. LOUIS — It produces a hodgepodge of winners. That’s the stigma associated with the PGA Championship. Compared to other majors’ ignominies—like the weather predicating who captures the claret jug or USGA officials unnecessarily intervening at the U.S. Open—the PGA’s alleged stain is relatively innocuous. But that belief is real, and Golf Digest’s own Brian Wacker set off a firestorm for reflecting that sentiment in a recent column, one that drew blowback from some past champions.

But is it fair? Or more importantly, correct? We know there are a host of names engraved on the Wanamaker Trophy that won’t sniff the Hall of Fame, yet every tournament boasts such a roll call. Which got us thinking: Which major—year in, year out—produces the “best” and “worst” winners?

For our investigation we used OWGR data from 2000 to 2017, giving each major 18 submissions for 72 winners total. Why 2000? That year Titleist’s Pro V1 and Nike’s solid-core Tour Accuracy golf balls were introduced, which from an equipment perspective is viewed as the parcel in how the game was played, and how it is today. Plus, manually charting this test became time-consuming, and 18 and 72 seemed apropos golf numbers.

Mentioned above, we pulled a player’s Official World Golf Ranking the week before their major triumph, giving us a snapshot of their stature in the game pre-victory. OWGR does have its critics, but it’s the best barometer available to illustrate this idea of a player’s standing.

So what does that equation reveal? This century, the Open Championship produces the “worst” winner, with an average OWGR rank of 42.55. The Masters has the highest average OWGR winner at 15.77, followed by the U.S. Open with a 21.83 mark and the PGA at 33.22.

That the Masters is decidedly lower than its major brethren is not a surprise. Only 85 to 90 players tee it up at Augusta National, a limited field compared to the competitions at the other three majors. The green jackets want to ensure a “name” entity join their ranks, and—judging by these numbers—that endeavor’s been a success.

However, there are outliers, so what happens if we subtract the highest OWGR winner from each tournament? Call this the Ben Curtis Corollary, because without his Cinderella story in the mix, the Open Championship jumps the PGA, 21.94 to 25.23. (The Masters remains the lowest at 12.65, the U.S. Open trailing at 18.41.)

There is another part to this equation. Chiefly, how often does a championship cater to the best in the world? Amazingly, the PGA Championship comes out on top, with nine of its last 18 winners—Tiger Woods three times, Rory McIlroy twice, Vijay Singh, Phil Mickelson, Padraig Harrington and Jason Day—ranking inside the top five in the world. That’s three more than the Masters and the British, and four better than the U.S. Open.

Moreover, only five times has the PGA Championship winner been ranked outside the top 30 this century. That’s equal to the U.S. Open, with six British Open victors outside the top 30 (the Masters has just two such instances: Zach Johnson and Angel Cabrera).

Mentioned above, the OWGR data provides only a glimpse before a player’s win, failing to showcase what followed. For example, Justin Thomas enters Bellerive as the defending PGA champion, ranked No. 2 in the world. A ranking markedly better than his No. 14 standing the week before his Quail Hollow triumph. Conversely, every major battles this issue, which somewhat negates its wrath.

Still, the OWGR numbers give us an idea of the merit of each event’s winner. And, at least this century, the PGA more than meets the standards of a major champion.

Source: golfdigest.com

Last Chance to Sign Up!

Sign Up Now:

STARTING AUG. 3!

Novice

Want to learn how to play golf? Then this is the perfect class for you to get started. The class focuses on fundamentally building golf swings the right way to help students develop good habits. After focusing on the full swing for the first three weeks of the class, we spend some time learning to chip and putt before taking our skills to the course to end the series.

To sign up – Call the Pro Shop (415) 492-1800 X1

Cost: $195 per person for series

Class Dates: Tuesday 6-7:30, Friday 12-1:30, Sunday 10:30- noon.

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STARTING AUG. 8!

Advanced Beginner

The sequel to the Beginners Series is designed to focus on your entire golf game. Each week we will work on a different aspect of the game including putting, chipping/pitching, and the full swing. In the last class, we will go over course management skills on the course.

*In order to take this class you must have taken part in at least one beginner series in the past.

To sign up – Call the Pro Shop (415) 492-1800 X1

Cost: $195 per person for series

Class Dates: Wednesday 6-7:30pm.

Sign Up Now:

STARTING AUG. 2!

 Intermediate

This class is designed as an intermediate class for those that have played substantially and are looking to work on their course management skills. What better way to do it than on the course with an Instructor! It’s the perfect way to help you transfer your skills from the range and on to the course.

To sign up please call the Pro Shop (415) 492-1800 X1

Cost: $229 per person for series

Class Dates: Thursday 2-3:30pm.

Live Music by Rumors

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Friday August 17th @7:30 on the Patio

****$10 cover charge****

Limited seating. Please call 415-491-5959 x2 for reservations today!

Skip the hassle of calling. Save time by booking online!